More cool tips and tricks from Subscribers and even a few "bonus" tips from Colin in this episode's video so check it out and see what you can learn from other wood workers

Watch it on Youtube: https://youtu.be/vChHDNwo9Go

Ah yes ... the stuck pails, how many times have we had this happen to us. I have struggled with these crazy plastic pails sticking together ... and often I have something else in my other hand, so there I am trying to unstick pales, one-handed and just making them stick even firmer .. sound familiar??

It baffles me how plastic can stick together so firmly, but there is a solution, thanks to Barry, and I tried it, and it works like a charm ...thank Barry for a quick solution for unsticking pales. 

Getting buckets un stuck 

I use pails a LOT, and they don't last forever, or maybe I am just hard on them but I seem to be buying pails on a more regular basis. The one thing I do with them is to use them as convenient storage containers for smaller project pieces that I am working on. Sometimes I have parts of a project in glue-up, or waiting for some sort of a part or you just need to get another project done in the middle of trying to complete something else, so what do you do to clear your workbench ... I move the smaller project into a pail. Keeps all the parts together, easy to carry the pail around, doesn't take up much space, a great short term storage.  

Here's a neat idea from Lukasz. Rather than taking his corrugated dust collector or shop vacuum filters outside and banging them with a stick as I do, then trying to dodge the dust, Lukasz put them in a plastic pail, with a lid, and just shapes them around for a few minutes and PRESTO all the dust is shaken away from the folds and if you leave it for a few minutes, the dust all settles to the bottom of the pail and you can lift the lid and take out the newly cleaned filter.  

Cleaning wood dust filter
Michael recently was working on a project that he wanted to finish both sides at the same time, so he devised a small rack and used toothpicks to elevate the parts so both sides could be finished at the same time. I have done the same thing and I have found that sometimes using 3 toothpicks, or in my case, I often use finishing nails with the point side up, and with three points the wood is stable and doesn't rock ... if it will take them, sometimes you need more depending on weight, etc.,
Great Tip Michael ... thanks  

Drying Rack

Larry sent a tip to me that he often uses Ziplock or similar bags to keep his bits and parts organized, thanks for the reminder Larry because I do the same thing, and here are some of my boxes of overflow, extras, and orphaned nuts, bolts, screws and washers that I keep in bags, and label them, so I know what they are.

Screw Storage

Here's a great tip from Timothy that for some reason has eluded me all this time ... what Timothy does when he wants to find the center of a board, is use a speed square to draw a line across the board, the using that line as a reference, draw 2 - intersecting, diagonal 45-degree lines. Right at the place where the lines cross is the exact center of the board ... quick, easy, and accurate. Excellent tip, thanks Timothy 

Easy center of boards
This tip is from Sylvian, who has been a woodworker for some 30 years and has been using a 50 / 50 mixture of lacquer and lacquer thinner as a "sealer" on wood before he applies his topcoat. He did not tell me what he uses for a topcoat, but probably any of the "Film" finishes, like Lacquer, Varnish, Polyurethane, or similar finishes. This seal coating would not work with penetrating oils like Osmo, Rubio, Teak Oil, Boiled Linseed Oil, and similar oil products.
If you have questions or want to learn more or follow Silvain on Instagram, his address there is ... @la_rose_aux_bois

Well ... lots of cool ideas in this episode, many ideas to make our life in the workshop more convenient and more fun. I am always looking for ideas and if you have a tip or trick, send it into me by email and if it has not already been used I will include it in a future episode. 

Copyright Colin Knecht
woodworkweb

    

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